Untitled

kierongillen:

alwaysalreadyangry:

kierongillen:

septembriseur:

Wow, it’s so hard to understand why a woman-written comic about a female superhero who wears a sensible costume, writes fanfic, and stuffs her face with tasty gyros is so popular and trendy, while a cover for a forthcoming male-written book that portrays its female…

I think throwing Dennis under the bus here is pretty shitty.

i think that dennis is a really good writer (also the only comics writer i don’t know who i feel like i have to refer to by his first name), and after reading his take on early x-men in season 1 and some of avengers und

(Cut for length. Obv click through to read it. AlwaysAlreadyAngry is great and I am entirely with her in terms of general structural issues and problems in comics.)

The problem is that the only response I can have to this is to pull out covers of books with women writers that have sexually eye-raising covers (or alt-covers), which means throwing whatever writer and artist I choose under that same bus. It’ll be getting crowded beneath that bus. 

Blaming the writer for an artist’s choices is problematic on many levels. It gives writers a level of power they simply don’t possess - in fact, shouldn’t possess. When the original post is slanted towards mentioning facts when they’re relevant is implication that the fact it’s a male writer is a big part of problem. The fact that it’s front loaded in the sentence implies it’s the primary problem.

(That both series artists are male isn’t touched on - in fact, all the credit or the blame to the choices in the book is given to the writer. This is a fundamental misunderstanding of how comics work.)

When Dennis has done literally nothing here, I think it’s unfair of the original poster. And worth stressing, I’m responding to the comment by the OP rather than the article.

Clearly involving women more in all aspects of the creative process in comics is a good thing. But, this entire mess seems more like an editorial problem than a writer or even artist one. Someone in editorial chose to commission and market a porny variant cover from an artist known for drawing erotica on a female helmed book. Someone in editorial chose to put Greg Land, who say what you will about him as a storyteller, has a style that tends towards… let’s say problematic portrayals of women. (For me, the Land cover is the more worrying one, because it shows a lot of the same weird anatomy and male gaze issues and is representative of the art that will actually be in the comic.) While Dennis Hopeless seems like a good fit for the book, editorial has made suboptimal choices elsewhere on the title.

I think this speaks to how important it is to have women in senior editorial roles. I suspect if someone up the foodchain was female we would see less egregiously sexist malarky and probably more women in creative teams too.

Also, someone really needs to point out to Marvel editorial how dumb all of this is. I know a few female Carol Corps members who are 1) ravenously reading comics and 2) were probably first introduced to Jessica Drew through Kelly Sue DeConnick’s work on Captain Marvel and Avengers Assemble. This is just casual observation, but the Carol Corps seems to really like Spider-Woman and would probably be a built in audience for this book. This is also an audience that probably feels pretty shitted all over right now by the editorial choices on this book. Porny variant covers aren’t just crass and icky, but are also probably bad for longterm business. 

(Which is to say women geeks have money! Why are we treating them badly!?)

I'm 22 and my hair has rapidly started disappearing. I think you said that you went through something similar? Any shaving tips?
Anonymous

kierongillen:

magesmagesmages:

kierongillen:

"What’s it like going bald early?"
"It’s like your hair falling out. Obv!"

Conversations I’ve wanted to have all my life, and no-one ever gave me the feedline.

It was tricky for me. I had serious acne until I was 18 and started losing my hair at 19. I had about a period of 6 months when I was pretty hot stuff. That my hair was basically the main thing my girlfriends said was attractive about me - By 19, my hair was ass-length when wet, and was an excitingly Byronic metal-hero mop of fuzz. So, with an awful teenagers’ insecurity, that was pretty crap and I lost a lot of sleep over it. Hair-pulling is, of course, counter-productive.

I started losing my hair young, but it wasn’t exactly fast. I also had a lot of hair. There was actually a sort of golden period where my hair became properly manageable instead of being basically a WW1 defensive line on my head. And that it was kinda slow, I was aware of it literally years before anyone else started to notice. Of course, I spent the first half of that time entirely paranoid that everyone could see it.

That was a waste of my time and emotions. It doesn’t really matter.

Keep the hair as long as you like, or until you think it looks bad, then just shave the fucker. I use a setting of one on a shaver thing. I used to do two for about a decade. I do it myself, and get someone else to neaten up the back. You will save a lot of money.

I shaved mine when I was… 24? Or 23? I just went to the barber one lunch, had it razored, and walked back in. Genuinely managed to gather a crowd of people following me to stare at it when I walked back through the magazine offices, which still makes me smile.

There’s one thing worth stressing though - you say losing your hair quickly. Do you mean really quickly? I’ve had friends who’ve lost literally all their hair overnight. Either way, if it’s genuine hair loss very quickly, a trip to the doctor is a good idea. This could be a symptom of something else rather than you losing many exciting grooming options.

Of all the many things that can go wrong with your body, it’s a mild one. In the larger scale of things, try to be grateful. This is easier said than done when you think it’s preventing you making out with as many people as you’d like.

One of my best friends went bald at 17. Completely bald. He shaved from day one but he once confessed to me over a beer (okay over several beers) that he cried about it every night for nearly a year.

Speaking as a woman, I only ever notice if a guy has hair problems if HE notices it, if that makes sense. Obviously hard to do when self esteem is so fragile at that young an age, but yeah, bald dudes are just as attractive as not bald dudes at least to me. 

I mean, I’ve got a thing for Jean Luc Picard and Vin Diesel. I also like Sebastian Stan. Hair, no hair, all the hair. Everyone is hot in their own way.

Oh yeah. I mean, Not quite that, but I did my share of crying and spent a few years feeling paranoid and uncomfortable any time anyone was sitting behind and above me. And I was lucky.

But it’s as you say. It’s very much about attitudes in society rather than anything in reality. And, in a real way, the only thing which society seems to really kick against is guys who try and desperately hide it. Own yourself. This goes for almost everything, I find.

But, yes, guys are loathe to talk about anything. THE PATRIARCHY HURTS EVERYONE, etc.

And everyone has a thing for Picard and Vin Diesel. Stan could lack a head, and everyone would still crave him.

I’m balding in the weirdest way (back-to-front starting at 20, then a seam down the middle, and now kind of a double crest thingy and monk spot). I’m tallish so no one really noticed until it was pretty far along at which point I just started to keep it close cropped (#1 track on a $40 hair trimmer) and my wife, who kind of hated my once-a-year-haircut shaggy days is much, much happier with my tidier appearance. My wife who married me well into my baldness I might add.

And real talk, there are so many more annoying aspects of being mostly bald than appearance. Like, when it rains my face pretty much gets instantly wet, when it’s cold (I live in Canada) my head is cold, and sunburns of the head are awful. Hats have become an affectation not for style or baldness hiding but for climate. If you are balding don’t sweat looking bad: in my experience no one cares. Instead worry about the elements and finding hats that look good on you because you will miss the climate control of hair.

(Seriously, why don’t bald dudes warn you about this? And why do so few hats suit my face?)

(It did sting a little when my wife pointed out she could see my baldspot on television when I went to a hockey game with good seats in the arc of the video cameras though…)

Why is Thor always the Avenger who's remade as a woman? Wouldn't a female take on Captain America or Iron Man be more interesting at this point?

postcardsfromspace:

The answer to the second question is definitely yes.

I thought about the first question for a while, and the two answers I kept coming back to were:

  • Thor has long, flowing hair, and
  • Changing the gender of a superhero whose name is primarily associated with a mythic figure is probably less threatening to the fragile heteromasculinity of dudebros than doing so with superheroes primarily associated with human men.

I am open to less cynical explanations. But that’s what I’ve got.

I wonder if it could be part of a longterm movie plan. Like, they could put Rhodey in the Suit if Downey walks and have Bucky take up the shield when Evans is done. Maybe creating a female Thor storyline is part of opening escape routes if/when Hemsworth is ready to move on?

A look at how Blankets uses exaggeration to capture emotional memories.

A look at some young teen favourites that have deep and remarkable flaws. 

Some thoughts on a moment in The Manhattan Projects that stocks with me.

czechthecount:

Lions Gate Bridge

Freaking love the Lions Gate. This is so cool.

czechthecount:

Lions Gate Bridge

Freaking love the Lions Gate. This is so cool.

prettydeadlycomic:

kellysue:

Where’s that person who was asking about Pretty Deadly…?

Reblogging this to the Pretty Deadly tumblr too, and I just want to say how grateful we all are (I know I speak for Emma, Jordie, Clayton and Sigrid here) when folks engage the book like this.  

Samantha, Michael, Sarah… I know there have been others.  In your work you give us a way to see our work as a thing separate from our construction of it (which, if I’m being honest, is how PD has always felt — more like discovery than creation).  That is such a gift.  

I’ve struggled a lot with whether or not read things like this for fear of being influenced by them. It’s in my programming to want to be a pleaser and I’m always afraid I’ll unconsciously vie for the attention or approval of people who comment on the work. I’ve talked about it before; it’s very dangerous territory.   

But now that volume one is complete, I feel somewhat safer.  

And… I dunno.  I just feel like ‘thank you for also caring about this weird little creature that we care about so much.’

You better believe I’ve got a monster of a post brewing for PD#5, because that comic has the depths of hades in it. It’ll show up in a couple weeks because I need to sort out how to talk about it, have some other stuff queued, and I want to crawl all over spoilers like a jerk. But yeah: that comic literally took me an hour to read and stove my head in. PD is a comic that is a pleasure to read and write about.

xvsybook:

Are you Duran Duran or BSB? Heathers or Mean Girls? Grunge flannel or girly baby tees? This is what happens when sisters of two different generations — Gen X & Gen Y — talk about the things they love…as well as the stuff they don’t quite see eye-to-eye on. Get your copy here!

Ugh, what a trolly inforgraphic. When we talk about formative media from from my youth as a GenYer these diagrams ignore all of the 90s things that actually mean something to me. Like just looking at movies, The Matrix, Gladiator, Jurassic Park, The Big Lebowski, and Austin Powers were a much bigger deal in my peer group than anything other than Titanic. Also the notion that Gen Y wasn’t weaned on Star Wars is silly. And TV! No mention of Seinfeld, Friends, or Home Improvement. And the things they include in the 80s stuff: Ghost World and Infinite Jest? Yeah those were mainstream cultural cornerstones comparable with Harry Potter

xvsybook:

Are you Duran Duran or BSB? Heathers or Mean Girls? Grunge flannel or girly baby tees? This is what happens when sisters of two different generations — Gen X & Gen Y — talk about the things they love…as well as the stuff they don’t quite see eye-to-eye on. Get your copy here!

Ugh, what a trolly inforgraphic. When we talk about formative media from from my youth as a GenYer these diagrams ignore all of the 90s things that actually mean something to me. Like just looking at movies, The Matrix, Gladiator, Jurassic Park, The Big Lebowski, and Austin Powers were a much bigger deal in my peer group than anything other than Titanic. Also the notion that Gen Y wasn’t weaned on Star Wars is silly. And TV! No mention of Seinfeld, Friends, or Home Improvement. And the things they include in the 80s stuff: Ghost World and Infinite Jest? Yeah those were mainstream cultural cornerstones comparable with Harry Potter

Should I rewatch Star Wars in order of release or in story order?
Anonymous

kellysue:

distractedbyshinyobjects:

soloontherocks:

I AM HERE FOR THIS QUESTION.

I’m about to blow your mind.

NEITHER.

Read More

This is a good idea AND a good read.

(My recommended order is 456. I never saw the prequels and I super don’t care.)

Kelly Sue DeConnick, summing up my feelings on Star Wars and its extended fandom in one sentence. 

(But seriously, Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back is one of my five favourite movies and the original movies are the one piece of typically-geek culture my spouse actually loves. And I’ve read like 40 odd Star Wars novels in my lifetime…. but yeah three worthwhile movies, some still beloved books, and sucks to the rest.)